Sublime is sublime Closing

Well its an early morning. I can blame the travel from London for that. I managed to struggle through to the end of the second period watching the canadiens game last night. I was a bit worried entering the third but was quite happy to see they won when I woke up :)

In this post I just want to sum up the other posts from the sublime series as well as add a few tidbits. In the post series we have learned how to setup sublime for .net development. We have covered how to setup project/solution support. How to get intellisense and some basic refactoring. Even how to get automated builds and tests running (all in linux).

We have also looked at a lot of other things that are built on top of sublime that are fairly useful if you are doing other types of development such as javascript or html5. Many of these tools far outclass the Visual Studio equivalents and are usable with many other environments (such as using a ruby backend).

I have personally given up on using Visual Studio as a whole. I will however keep a vm with it on it for some very specific tasks that it does well (such as line by line debugging). These are not things I use in my daily worksflow but are nice to have when you absolutely need them.

Some other changes have come about in the use of sublime as my primary editor. A big one is that when I am writing one off code (which I do alot) I do not bother creating project or solution files any more. I instead just create C# files then either run the command line directly to the compiler or create a small make file. It sounds odd but its actually much simpler than creating project/solution files overall.

There will also be much going on in this space coming up. As of now the sublime plugin supports maybe 20% of what omnisharp is capable of. There will be quite a bit of further support coming in. As an example I was looking the other day at supporting run tests in context from inside of sublime (in test->run test, on fixture->run fixture). There is also much coming in for refactoring support and my guess is that you will see even more coming in on this due to nrefactory moving to roslyn. I think within a year you will find most of this tooling built in.

Another thing that I added to sublime though there isn’t really an official plugin for it yet is sublime repl + script cs. I find it quite common to grab a function and work it out in the repl first and then move it back into the code. A perfect example of this happened to me while in London. I was trying to combine to Uris and was getting some odd behaviour. Three minutes in the repl showed exactly what the issue was.

Moving to sublime will change the way that you work a bit but is definitely worth trying. Remember that a primary benefit of working in this way is that everything that you are doing is a composition of pieces that will also apply to any other code you happen to be working on (whether its C/Ruby/Erlang/even F#).

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