TDD/BDD as Architectural Tools

InfoQ has made another of my DevTeach talks available online – TDD/BDD as Architectural Tools. Enjoy!

TDD/BDD as Architectural Tools

As architects, we have all experienced the folly of BDUF (Big Design Up Front) – spending weeks or months perfecting an architecture that fails when it meets the real requirements and real code. Is it possible to design in the small? How can we avoid unintended complexity, which cripples so many code bases? Can we build enough of an architecture to start writing code and then flesh out our architecture as the code evolves? In this session we examine how Test-Driven Development (TDD) and Behaviour-Driven Development (BDD) allow us to solve these conundrums. We will see how we can use TDD/BDD to focus our architectural efforts in the high-value areas of our code base to achieve just-in-time architecture.

About James Kovacs

James Kovacs is a Technical Evangelist for JetBrains. He is passionate in sharing his knowledge about OO, SOLID, TDD/BDD, testing, object-relational mapping, dependency injection, refactoring, continuous integration, and related techniques. He blogs on CodeBetter.com as well as his own blog, is a technical contributor for Pluralsight, writes articles for MSDN Magazine and CoDe Magazine, and is a frequent speaker at conferences and user groups. He is the creator of psake, a PowerShell-based build automation tool, intended to save developers from XML Hell. James is the Ruby Track Chair for DevTeach, one of Canada’s largest independent developer conferences. He received his Bachelors degree from the University of Toronto and his Masters degree from Harvard University.
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  • jdn

    James:

    Very nice presentation, well done.