KaizenConf’08 Functional Programming Presentation Video

Last week, I provided a basic wrap up of my functional programming talk at the Continuous Improvement in Software Development conference (KaizenConf) in Austin.  Little did I realize that I was indeed being filmed while I talked by Mark Leon Watson.  So, without further ado, enjoy the first 20 minutes of my talk. I should emphasize though that it’s not the official position that designers will never be there, but instead, it’s not the highest priority. In time, they may come as needs arise.

In this section of the talk, I cover the following areas:

  • What is Functional Programming?
  • Why does it matter?
  • How do we do it?
  • Functional C#, what parts are functional and what parts aren’t
  • What is F# and why is it useful?

 



Functional Programming – Is it a Game Changer? (Part 1 – KaizenConf ’08 Workshop) from Mark Leon Watson on Vimeo

 

Thanks to Mark and I hope you all enjoy and feedback would be appreciated.  I haven’t yet made my F# samples available, but as always, my C# ones are available at the Functional C# library on MSDN Code Gallery.  More will be added there shortly to reflect some of the things I talked about here in the slides.

 

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  • http://podwysocki.codebetter.com Matthew.Podwysocki

    @Gustaf

    Thanks! This is only the first 20 minutes of the three hour presentation. I’m not sure if the other portions have been posted yet. There is still a lot to cover.

    Right, there is a bit of finesse to finding how FP fits in the OOP mindset and something I’m working on in terms of guidance. I think some of this presentation brings that to bear.

    Thanks for the comment. I do appreciate it!

    Matt

  • http://twitter.com/gustaf_nk Gustaf Nilsson Kotte

    Great presentation! I really like that you’re using “x over y”, similar to the agile manifesto, making FP look more like a good set of principles rather than something that’s black-or-white.

    One question: did you consider mentioning monads? I know, it’s quite an advanced topic, but it could be nice to mention that there’s “gold at the end of the rainbow” :)

    I’ve been following your blog and twitter for some time now. Keep up the good work!