Don’t just CodeBetter, LiveBetter too!

Update: Ok, this is not a reflection on conference food.  Microsoft catered in some rather healthy food for everybody to eat.  It was more a reflection on our computer knowledgable population in general.  Yes, I did observe some rather unhealthy habits at the conference, but that wasn't due to Microsoft bringing in truckloads of Ding Dongs and Twinkies (although I have heard that has happened in the past?  Just a rumor.). 

Ok, I'm certainly not singling anybody out here, but as a collective, there is a decent percentage of programmers that are obviously overweight.  You've heard people talk: that fat, glasses wearing, backpack toting guy MUST be a geek!  Even if you don't wear glasses and tote a backpack with a laptop inside, if you're plain overweight, people assume you have a high probability of being a computer geek!

So what can you do about it?  At the MVP summit, I observed many things (unhealthy things) that I believe people can do to curb their diets and become healthier, leaner people.  Am I the ideal role model for geek physique and healthy living?  Oh hell no!  I myself have unwanted weight that needs to be shed, but it takes time and effort.

So I'm going to tell you about my "Programmer's Diet".  Its not any different from what you've heard in the past about other diets, but from geek to geek, maybe you'll take note of it as it works well for me.

QUIT DRINKING ALL THAT SODA!!  For crying out loud, I think the software industry is in dire need of the programmer community.  The amount of sugary and caffeinated products that going into our collective system is enough to keep the entire soft drink producing business afloat.  Soda is not good for you, especially if you don't exercise.  You can't just sit and drink soda all day long.  You need to start making adjustments to your lifestyle that allow you to maintain your current rate of production but while eating more carbs more frequently during the day rather than supplementing your energy intake with energy drinks and sodas.  Once you drink a soda, you have to keep drinking it to sustain the pace of energy in which you started because you have to avoid that "crash".  Its like drugs, once you start, you have to keep taking more and more to sustain the same level of high you got the first time.  That soda first thing in the morning is like being a crack addict.  You have now given yourself up to the daylong exposure and consumption of sugar and caffeine.  Avoid it all together, especially in the morning hours.

Understand your body.  Understand what makes you tick, your level of metabolism, your daily energy output and your base metabolic rate (BMR).  Your base metabolic rate is the amount of calories you must intake every 24 hours in order for your body to perform its base functions (pump blood, brain function, breathing) while at complete rest.  I am 6 ft 0 inches and 205 lbs.  I am a 31 year old male.  My BMR is right at 1950 calories.  BMR is calculated using the following formula:

English BMR Formula

Women: BMR = 655 + ( 4.35 x weight in pounds ) + ( 4.7 x height in inches ) – ( 4.7 x age in years )
Men: BMR = 66 + ( 6.23 x weight in pounds ) + ( 12.7 x height in inches ) – ( 6.8 x age in year )

Metric BMR Formula

Women: BMR = 655 + ( 9.6 x weight in kilos ) + ( 1.8 x height in cm ) – ( 4.7 x age in years )
Men: BMR = 66 + ( 13.7 x weight in kilos ) + ( 5 x height in cm ) – ( 6.8 x age in years )

Now you have to start to consider the amount of exercise you perform each day.  There is an actual equation used to calculate this stuff, called the Harris Benedict equation:

  1. If you are sedentary (little or no exercise) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.2
  2. If you are lightly active (light exercise/sports 1-3 days/week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.375
  3. If you are moderately active (moderate exercise/sports 3-5 days/week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.55
  4. If you are very active (hard exercise/sports 6-7 days a week) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.725
  5. If you are extra active (very hard exercise/sports & physical job or 2x training) : Calorie-Calculation = BMR x 1.9

I go to the gym 5 days a week, M-F, and lift weights for 60 minutes each day.  No cardiac.  This equates to moderate exercise.  So my daily calorie requirement is 1950 * 1.55 = 3021 calories.  This means that in order for me to do what I do and not gain or lose any weight, I need 3000 calories per day.

Now gets to part about gaining and losing weight.  The most important thing about adjusting weight is to know how many calories you intake every day.  This is critical.  Without putting in the effort to figure that out, you're not going to be able to adjust your lifestyle.  This is critical.  Once you know, then you can adjust your caloric intake to whether or not you want to lose or gain weight.  If you want to lose weight, you need to both exercise and consume less calories than your daily calorie needs.  If you want to gain weight, well, there are 2 options.  One, you can take in more calories than you need and sit on your ass all day.  This will make you fat.  Or, you can take in more calories than you need and lift weights.  This will make you more muscular.  Its a pretty straightforward thing there.  Either gain fat, or gain muscle.  For you men, ask the lady's which they prefer.

So now that you understand the whole calories thing, you need to understand something else crucial to healthier living.  Don't eat 3 meals a day.  For example, if you need 3000 calories per day, and you eat 500 for breakfast, 1500 for lunch and another 1000 for supper (that's dinner for you non-southern-USA people), you're still not doing well, but better.  When you consume too many calories at one time, well your body can't use them all at one time.  Your body needs them spread out over a long period of time.  Too many at once and the excess gets stored as fat.  You MUST eat 5 to 6 small meals throughout the day, about 500 calories each for you 3000 calorie people.  This insures that you do not overload more calories into your body that what can be consumed in a given time.  Eat first thing in the morning, 4 more times spread throughout the day, and then again right before you go to bed.  That is a much healthier eating habit.

Also, eat good, quality protein.  This also is key.  You can't just eat any kind of calories, you need good calories with quality carbs and protein.  If you lift weights like I do, then your body needs LOTS of protein, about 1.5 grams per lb of body weight.  For me that's 300 grams of protein per day.  Muscle is built with protein and is HIGHLY IMPORTANT for gaining quality body mass.

Its just as simple if you want to lose weight.  Most high protein foods are low in carbs and even lower in saturated fats.  Eating high protein diets is also usually eating a low carb diet.  In order to lose weight, in addition to what we already discussed about calorie intake, high protein, low carb low sat fat diets is a must.

What are some of the common and basic high protein foods?  Chicken, turkey, lean meats and beef, any type of fish, egg whites, dairy products.  Its more difficult for those trying to add mass as opposed to lose weight, as we must consume both high protein and high carb diets.

So I've laid out a great starting point for you to consider looking at to curb your diet and live a better and healthier lifestyle.  Know how many calories you need, know how many calories you eat, adjust accordingly, exercise, eat the right kinds of calories in the forms of proteins and low carbs to lose weight, high carbs to gain weight.

Disclaimer: I have never in my life taken a nutrition, food, health, diet, etc course or training.  I know what I've studied on my own and what works for me.  ALWAYS consult your doctor before starting a new diet and/or exercise plan.  I can only be held responsible if in 12 weeks from now you start to resemble one of the Spartan actors from the movie 300 by following my advice.  Otherwise, I had nothing to do with it.

This entry was posted in Generalities. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

29 Responses to Don’t just CodeBetter, LiveBetter too!

  1. I think you’ve got a lot of readers that are more than thankful to you and really pleased with the content on your blog, making me fantastically interested in what post will be next and about.

  2. I think you’ve got a lot of readers that are more than thankful to you and really pleased with the content on your blog, making me fantastically interested in what post will be next and about.

  3. A programmer says:

    Raymond, nice info. I am male slim programmer who always wants to put more weight on. I’m what is known as a hardgainer.

    Two years ago, my belly was as fat and big as Homer Simpson’s one, thanks to soda, sugar, rice and no exercices. And the rest of my body was slim. So you can figure how funny did I look. Then I seriously started to change my nutriton habits and going to the gym. My belly now is flat, but it took a lot of time.
    Then I changed weight lifting for isometric exercices and pull ups.

    What every programmer has to know is that for being sit 8 or 10 hours every day, your bones and body need strong MUSCLES to be confortable in the same position for many hours.

  4. I was really glad upon reading your post because for the first time someone didn’t just talk about boring codes and becoming a popular programmer. For the very first time, someone talked about health and wellness. I personally think that someone can be at his best at work if he gets enough rest and eats nutritious food at the right time. Health is wealth. It’s stupid to think that you’ll just work and work without considering your health.

  5. chain saw says:

    I think one thing programmers need to realize about their health is that ours is a profession where we sit for eight hours or more a day. That’s all we do for work, and once we finish staring at the computer screen for a third of our day, many of us go home and proceed to get on the internet for four or five hours to read things (like your blog!) or to check our personal emails and update our own blogs. When do programmers exercise? After a few years of working as a programmer full time, I realized I was becoming what you described as the stereotypical computer geek. That scared me more than anything, so I set up an exercise schedule (nothing strenuous – walking/jogging when the weather is nice, riding my exercise bike when it’s not, and playing more racquetball). Following my schedule to the letter has got me back in shape, as has eating well. Thank you for that information – eating healthy and exercise combined can really get you back in shape Although I must admit I haven’t kicked the soda habit…I try so hard, but I am addicted…at least I know I have a problem!

  6. Nick Parker says:

    Absolutely great stuff Raymond!

  7. rlewallen says:

    Jeff, I realize Keith is speaking truths in regard to just taking in less calories will cause you to lose weight. My argument was that it is very unhealthy, which is why I didn’t say he was wrong in that regard, only that he wasn’t speaking the whole truth. The article wasn’t about weight loss. It was about being healthy and if you are going to talk about how to lose weight, explain how to do it in a healthy way. You can lose weight by becoming anorexic, but that’s bad advice. See what I’m saying?

  8. Keith is actually pretty close to the truth. It is 100% true that the only thing you technically need to lose weight is a caloric deficit. Notice I didn’t say what kind of weight loss (muscle tissue or fat). Caloric deficit also doesn’t address the health implications such as effects on blood sugar, cholesterol, etc…251

    I think the point you might be arguing on is that just creating that deficit is not the optimal or healthiest way to do so. I agree with your sentiment here.. Exercise and balanced nutrition will obviously help and exacerbate any weight loss brought on by the deficit.

    I have been overweight for about 9 years now, this year I decided to make a change. Since January 1st I have lost 31 lbs going from 293 to 262 (so far). More importantly I have learned that eating right doesn’t mean as much sacrifice as I thought it would be.

    I looked around at all of the major diets on the market as well as a ton of research on metabolism and nutrition in general. In the end I decided on Weight Watchers. Their program seemed to be in line with what I wanted: my goal isn’t go go on a diet.

    You have to change your lifestyle completely.

  9. mbarnes says:

    Excellent post. As a diabetic who has successfully followed a low carb diet for 2.5 years and lost 30 lbs in the process, I wanted to share a vivid fast food illustration. In a typical low carb meal you are limited to 60 carbs. A fast food meal that consists of a quarter pounder w/ cheese, fries, and soda. EACH item has 60 carbs. If you ate all 3 that would be a 3 times the amount of food you should eat. Of course you could just have one, but to make it healthier I choose the sandwich and a diet soda (no carbs). Once in a rare while have a totally unhealthy snack like fries but do it several hours AFTER your meal as opposed to with it.

  10. jkimble says:

    Excellent post! I learned of the dangers of soda a while back and finally pretty much quit all soda consumption last year.. the net result was a loss of about 20-30 lbs in the last year (of course I also made changes to my habits… no taking an elevator up or down 1 floor… or for that matter 2 floors).

    I also have since going independent started taking daily walks I currently briskly walk about 1 mile a day (I probably need to do more, but the wait is currently falling, so I must be doing something right).

  11. Nic Webb says:

    A great post that touches on one of the more painful stereotypes in our industry. Being a Type I diabetic, eating right and staying healthy is something that has been drilled into me since I was seven.

    You’re right on about the 5-6 meals plan. That’s how I used to eat, back in Junior High (small snacks throughout the day. It made all my classmates jealous, until I pulled out the syringe!) and I know that type of eating is better for you. Otherwise, you’re just starving yourself. I cringe when I hear “I just skip breakfast!” Great – you’re setting yourself up to have every calorie you eat during lunch stored away. And don’t get me started on Atkins – just ask any diabetic what it was like before they found out they were diabetic, the things their body went through.

    Don’t get me wrong though – low-(bad) carb, high protien diets are great, especially for building muscle. Especially if you watch the types of carbs you eat – whole grains versus processed, easy calories. Make your body work for those nutrients!

    Plus, with a healthy body, comes a heatlhy mind. And we could all use one of those.

  12. Erik Lane says:

    Great post Raymond. This is something that’s not really talked about in the community. I’m trying..going slow but I’ll get there again.

  13. rlewallen says:

    Keith,

    Again, thank for the feedback.

    “by doing one then the other i think they both become easier.”

    Certainly true for a lot of people. I think that if you can do both, its probably better, but it comes down to personal preference.

    “if anything, visually i gained muscle due to the fact that the fat which used to be surrounding my muscle was gone so you could see them better :)”

    The good thing about that is that when you lose fat stored around muscles, you certainly are leaner, and its kind of pumps you up to start actually getting into to exercise and weight training because you are getting satisfaction from the way you look and feel, and you want to do more.

    “no matter what your diet is, if you go back to eating how you did before then you’ll gain the weight back, guaranteed.”

    Not necessarily true. If you increase your metabolism by eating smaller and more frequent meals and exercising, and stick with that program, you actually eat more a few months into the program than you did before you started the program, just to get to the point where you quit losing weight and start maintaining that healthier lifestyle and looking and feeling good and healthy. The goal is not to just lose weight, its to change your lifestyle, and in doing so, you’ll find that you can eat pretty much anything you want as long as you are sticking with a lifestyle that maintains your high metabolism and you keep with your exercise program. They key is maintaining exercise and metabolism, not really food, once you get your body to that point where you’ve hit your weightloss goal.

    Thanks for the feedback Keith!

  14. you raise alot of good points, and thats where you have to ask yourself “am i trying to lose weight, and then get healthy, or am i trying to lose weight and get healthy at the same time?” my goal was to lose the weight (weight, not fat) first, and then begin an execise regiment. IMO trying to do them at the same time adds unneccesary complications to both. (example: building muscle is healthy, and losing weight is healthy, but one requires a calorie excess and the other a calorie deficit) by doing one then the other i think they both become easier. granted, it may take longer my way, but it wasn’t a race for me.

    as far as losing lean mass vs. fat when dieting alone, this may be one of those “in theory, practice and theory are the same, but in practice they are different” kind of things. my diet was 0% exercise (as far as calculating extra burnt calories) and while i’m sure you are correct and at a ratio level i lost more muscle than i would have if exercising, it was negligable to me. for all intents and purposes, i had the “same” amount of muscle as when i started the diet. none of the physical exertions i did were any harder, nor was my stamina lower. if anything, visually i gained muscle due to the fact that the fat which used to be surrounding my muscle was gone so you could see them better :)

    IMO, i think losing FAT is too ideal of a goal since your body is going to change so much anyway during a diet. i think a more reasonable goal is to be concerned with weighing in at a “healthy” weight for your age/height/sex/etc. once there you can then (more easily) build muscle and get healthy. of course this is all my opinion based on anecdotal evidence, but my experience with the diet shed a lot of light on the subject for me.

    “You also cause the body to decrease metabolism by eating fewer meals and when you get out of diet mode and start eating again, you’re going to gain fat because you are taking in too many calories.”

    that is a whole different issue really, and comes down to people wanting a quick fix vs. a lifestyle change. no matter what your diet is, if you go back to eating how you did before then you’ll gain the weight back, guaranteed. for example, even though i hit my goal, i am still counting my calories (i just count more of them!) everyday. if i know how many calories are going in and out everyday, then my meal plan is really inconsequential in the long run.

  15. rlewallen says:

    Keith,

    “the only requirement for weight loss is a calorie deficit. your body (without exercise) burns a set amount of calories, so a sufficient deficit will result in fat burned.”

    Not the whole truth. While your body will burn fat, you will also lose lean mass, as in muscle tissue. I once read a medical study that low carb high protein diets produce on average 80% fat loss and 20% lean tissue loss for the makeup of total weight loss. This has been recorded in some study groups as high as 30% total loss coming from lean tissue for those who diet without exercise. With diet + aerobics, you decrease lean tissue loss anywhere from 5 to 10%. With diet, aerobics and exercise, 97% of total weight loss came from fat tissue alone, strength was increased and oxygen consumption peaks were higher. The studies that were done concluded that diet + aerobic + strength training was far above and beyond any other method standing on its own. In short, yes, you can lose weight, but you’re going to lose a lot of lean tissue if you just diet alone. You should be able to find these statistics on PubMed.gov, which is where I believe I read them once upon a time.

    “absolutely not true. will it IS true that a 1500 calorie meal will be split between energy and fat, that fat will be burned immediately as energy as long as you are holding to a calorie deficit. for example, with your 1950 calorie/day estimate, you could eat ONE 1450 calorie meal a day and lose exactly a pound a week, just the same as if you ate 5, 290 calorie meals throughout the day. the only important factor here is calorie intake per day. obviously in the first case you’d be rediculously hungry all day, but there is nothing wrong with eating fewer meals as far as losing weight is concerned.”

    This statement you make is so wrong its actually scary. Weight loss has a LOT to do with metabolism. When you eat one meal per day, you put your body into a mode where it thinks it is starving. The body will start to consume valuable lean tissue to gets its energy requirements. Also what happens in starvation mode is that the body will PURPOSELY store some portions of intake as body fat because of the starvation mode you have put it in is a threat to the body. This perceived threat releases fat-depositing enzymes into the system which causes the body to store more fat. You also cause the body to decrease metabolism by eating fewer meals and when you get out of diet mode and start eating again, you’re going to gain fat because you are taking in too many calories. And you do this after the weight you actually lost was muscle! Lower metabolism causes the body to purposely store fat because it doesn’t know when its going to get fed again. If people go by what you say and just ignore the meals frequency, they will lose weight in muscle, and gain weight in fat. Eat more and smaller meals throughout the day so that you have a constant stream of energy into the body, which will increase metabolism (which is the key to the entire thing), avoid that threat of starvation to your body, keep your muscles fed and help burn fat (along with a good exercise plan).

    “as i’ve stated before, the ONLY factor which applies to losing weight is caloric intake.”

    Nothing against you, so don’t take it personally, but whatever or whoever gave you that advice gave you bad and unhealthy advice.

    “the absence of your stated items (protein, low carbs, low sat fats) will have no impact on weight loss if a caloric deficit is in place.”

    While this partially is true, its unhealthy. The US Dept of Agriculture even says that a healthy diet should consist of your calories coming from 25-30% low saturated fats, 55% from carbs and 15% from proteins. If you exercise, this helps feed and build lean tissue. Its all part of a balanced diet.

    “my highest recommendation to any developer wanting to lose weight is to follow the guidance in “The Hacker’s Diet” by John Walker. (creator of AutoCAD)”

    Preferably, don’t follow the advice of a software designer, including me. Like I said in the post, ALWAYS consult your physician, nutritionist, dietician, etc first before starting any changes to your eating and exercise lifestyles.

    “sorry for the evangelism, but i lost an easy 25 pounds with the hacker’s diet so i like to spread the word. :)”

    Don’t be sorry! Its great to get the feedback and let people read the different opinions on the matter :) I’m very to hear you have lost weight, if that was indeed your goal! Keep up the good work, and do what works for you.

    Keep in mind, this article was not about weight loss and crash diets, it was about living healthier. You’re analysis, while having a lot of true statements, and some completely false statements, is certainly not the healthiest way to lose weight and become more physically fit, but no doubt it works for a lot of people.

    I suppose eating 50 twinkies once per day and nothing else might cause you to lose weight, but is it really a good idea?

  16. while any post advising losing weight is beneficial and i whole-heartedly agree that the average programmer weight is astronomical, you make alot of statements which, while they may help, are definitely not a requirement for losing weight. please indulge my analysis for a bit :)

    “If you want to lose weight, you need to both exercise and consume less calories than your daily calorie needs”

    the only requirement for weight loss is a calorie deficit. your body (without exercise) burns a set amount of calories, so a sufficient deficit will result in fat burned.

    “Don’t eat 3 meals a day. Too many at once and the excess gets stored as fat. You MUST eat 5 to 6 small meals throughout the day”

    absolutely not true. will it IS true that a 1500 calorie meal will be split between energy and fat, that fat will be burned immediately as energy as long as you are holding to a calorie deficit. for example, with your 1950 calorie/day estimate, you could eat ONE 1450 calorie meal a day and lose exactly a pound a week, just the same as if you ate 5, 290 calorie meals throughout the day. the only important factor here is calorie intake per day. obviously in the first case you’d be rediculously hungry all day, but there is nothing wrong with eating fewer meals as far as losing weight is concerned.

    “In order to lose weight, in addition to what we already discussed about calorie intake, high protein, low carb low sat fat diets is a must.”

    as i’ve stated before, the ONLY factor which applies to losing weight is caloric intake. while there is an obvious corallation to foods with high fat content and large amounts of calories, the absence of your stated items (protein, low carbs, low sat fats) will have no impact on weight loss if a caloric deficit is in place.

    my highest recommendation to any developer wanting to lose weight is to follow the guidance in “The Hacker’s Diet” by John Walker. (creator of AutoCAD) the book is located entirely online at http://www.fourmilab.ch/hackdiet/ (READ IT!)

    his no-nonsense, systematic approach to weight loss will make anybody that designs software for a living (aka all of us) smile, because he approaches the problem of weight just like we approach a business or system problem.

    just like software, adding more complexity (no soda, exercise, certain foods, etc) is not the answer. take away that complexity (eat lesS!) if you really want to shed the pounds!

    sorry for the evangelism, but i lost an easy 25 pounds with the hacker’s diet so i like to spread the word. :)

  17. rlewallen says:

    Andy,

    Kids keeping you up at night certainly make it more challenging. Again, this is where diet comes in. Eat several small small meals throughout the day so you don’t overload and get that “I ate too much” feeling and get sleepy. Keep energy flowing into your body throughout the day.

    Also, black coffee, no cream or sugar, is good to drink too. Unsweetened tea too. They’ll provide you with moderate caffeine boosts without the sugary side-effects.

  18. Andy says:

    Having kids is a great way to switch off after work. I’ve learned that in less than 2 weeks. (http://flickr.com/photos/hardins/415788466/in/set-72157594582704000/)

    But that brings up the question, how do I stay awake during the day when I’m not getting enough sleep at night? Now I’m up to 2-3 cans of soda a day just to stay awake at work. I know I feel better without soda, since I’ve gone without it before, but right now I just don’t know what an alternative would be.

    `Andy

  19. dhayden says:

    Have kids is right :)

    Not only does it help you shut off, but I just spent an hour running next to my daughter while teaching her to ride a bike without training wheels. Great cardio workout!

    Definitely dump the soda. Not only do you just get empty calories, but it will rot your teeth. Drink green tea. Naturally boosts your metabolism, many health benefits, and has cavity / plaque fighting properties.

    Stay healthy everyone…

  20. rlewallen says:

    Smirnuff,

    Actually I can do that in two words. Have kids. Seriously.

    I actually have multiple ways that I switch off for awhile at the end of a day, and I’ll post on that.

  21. smirnuff says:

    Is there any chance of your publishing something equally informative on how developers can ‘switch off’ at the end of each day?

    This was a very interesting read, thanks.

  22. Karthik says:

    Great post Raymond. I quit drinking soda about 3 years ago and have felt a lot better ever since. Good advice for all devs to follow. No doubt the community needs a wake up call wiith regards to their health.

    I always say, going to the .NET user groups and looking around the room for about 3 minutes gives me all the motivation I need to hit the gym.

    If you really do want to look like the guys in 300, follow this routine:

    http://joshsgarage.typepad.com/articles/2006/11/frank_miller_mo.html

  23. Scott says:

    Ah, I see. Since you’re bulking up that makes sense.

    We always at a can of tuna after working out. No tuna salad, just tuna. Lots of protein.

    But amen about the soda. We commented on that during class a couple of times. Most people grab a coke and a cheeseburger or pizza. The sugar in the coke causes and insulin spike which means all that fat gets stored instead of burned. So even making a simple change like drinking water or unsweetened tea with your meal instead of a sugar drink can make a big difference. Now I think I’m keeping the Talking Rain company in business.

  24. rlewallen says:

    Phil,

    My cousin was recently diagnosed with adult onset diabetes. He was drinking 8 – 10 sodas per day. He cut down to 1 – 2 per day and lost 20 lbs in the first 6 weeks from that alone (well, he did make adjustments to his overall diet as well, but the Dr. told him the soda was the big factor in his weight loss).

  25. rlewallen says:

    Scott,

    I actually up my cardio by doing 2 lighter sets of 10 reps each before I hit my heavy sets for each lift. I’m bulking right now so I’m doing 4 sets of 6 reps of 8 rep max weight with 90 second rest. Thank goodness I only have 2 more weeks of that! I always hit complete failure on sets 3 and 4 on rep 5 and rep 4 respectively. That keeps my heart rate up in the 120s during my entire workout. Since I’m in weight gain mode at the moment, cardio sucks up too much of my carbs and protein that I need for the muscle building process. In 2 weeks I’ll be back to cardio mixed with weights because I’ll be in weight sustainment mode. You are right, you do need to have a good heart rate going when lifting weights. I just use light weight lifting to get there instead of say, running, prior to my heavy lifting.

  26. Haacked says:

    Well said! Not many realize just how awful the High Fructose Corn Syrup is. Sodas in the U.S. are even worse than Sodas elsewhere where they use real sugar.

    Of course cutting down both is good, but I saw one study that found a correlation to the sharp rise in obesity in the last 20 to 30 years and the introduction of HFCS.

  27. Scott says:

    “I go to the gym 5 days a week, M-F, and lift weights for 60 minutes each day. No cardiac. ”

    A small disclaimer, my major was Biochem in college and I’ve taken a few lessons from trainers. The one thing they all say is to do about 20 min of cardio before lifting weights. You get a lot more out of the weight training if you get your heart rate up before lifting. I found that to be true back when I was hitting the gym in college. Back then I could do a few reps at 225.

    Right now I’m on the 1-1/2 year old daughter learned how to run exercise regimen.

  28. rlewallen says:

    As much as I would love to see a revolution among office-dwellers to improve their eating habits, as long as it sparks some interest within oneself to live better, then I’ve almost accomplished my goal. When people start to take action and stick with it, then I’ll feel even better.

  29. Justice~! says:

    ABOUT TIME!!!!

    ABOUT TIME!!!

    Oh, my friend, I was just about to post on something similar. You do not know what revolution you may or may not have started!!!

Leave a Reply